How to Develop a National Formulary Based on the WHO Model Formulary - A Practical Guide
(2004; 45 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAbbreviations
Open this folder and view contents1 INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2 OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL FORMULARY PROCESS
Open this folder and view contents3 DEVELOPING THE PRELIMINARY INFORMATION SECTION
Close this folder4 DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC INFORMATION AND MONOGRAPHS USING THE WHO MODEL FORMULARY
View the documentAdapting the therapeutic classification system of the WHO model formulary
View the documentOptions for adapting information from the WHO model formulary in the national formulary
Open this folder and view contentsAddition of locally important, specific information to the WHO model formulary text
View the documentWriting new material for the national formulary
View the documentLanguage, style and presentation
View the documentTechnical copy-editing
Open this folder and view contents5 ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Open this folder and view contents6 DEVELOPING SPECIFIC INFORMATION SECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents7 PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLEMENTATION
Open this folder and view contents8 EVALUATION
Open this folder and view contents9 REVIEW AND UPDATE
View the documentREFERENCES
 

Writing new material for the national formulary

Once information has been collected and summarized for the purpose of insertion into the NF (see Chapter 5), it is crucial that development of the draft text follows a rigorous process including:

Writing the draft text in a clear, accurate style that is tailored to the purpose of the NF with sufficient detail in both introductory texts and in the monographs. The writing style used for additional text in the NF should be in harmony with the adapted WMF writing style.

Structuring the draft text to make the information easily accessible. Subheadings should follow existing structures. If the additional medicine will be used for different conditions, the relevant cross-references should be carefully included and monographs should reflect all recommended indications, dosage schedules, warnings, etc. for the different uses.

Reviewing the draft text at several levels:

• peer-review by members of the editorial team;

• content review by members of the advisory group to check readability and relevance to the intended audience; and

• technical copy-editing and proofreading to check accuracy and validity, as already described.


Formatting the draft text using a clearly distinguishable style that indicates additions to WMF text as discussed earlier.

Positioning of the draft text within the adapted text of the WMF. When inserting additional text in the introductory section, try to maintain the clarity of the WMF text while giving the necessary prominence to the additional local information. New monographs should be placed within the relevant therapeutic/pharmacological section. In the case of multiple indications, a decision needs to be made on where to place the main monograph and how to provide clear cross-references in other chapters where the medicine is mentioned.

Creating additional information to be included in specific sections such as that on drug interactions, other appendices, table of contents and indexing field codes.

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