How to Develop a National Formulary Based on the WHO Model Formulary - A Practical Guide
(2004; 45 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAbbreviations
Open this folder and view contents1 INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2 OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL FORMULARY PROCESS
Open this folder and view contents3 DEVELOPING THE PRELIMINARY INFORMATION SECTION
Close this folder4 DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC INFORMATION AND MONOGRAPHS USING THE WHO MODEL FORMULARY
View the documentAdapting the therapeutic classification system of the WHO model formulary
View the documentOptions for adapting information from the WHO model formulary in the national formulary
Close this folderAddition of locally important, specific information to the WHO model formulary text
View the documentIntroductory text of therapeutic sections
View the documentMonographs
View the documentBrand name(s)
View the documentPrice
View the documentWriting new material for the national formulary
View the documentLanguage, style and presentation
View the documentTechnical copy-editing
Open this folder and view contents5 ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Open this folder and view contents6 DEVELOPING SPECIFIC INFORMATION SECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents7 PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLEMENTATION
Open this folder and view contents8 EVALUATION
Open this folder and view contents9 REVIEW AND UPDATE
View the documentREFERENCES
 

Price

In certain countries it may not be possible to include prices for all products because of inflation and frequent changes in suppliers, or if the time taken to produce the formulary would result in outdated price information.

In such cases symbols or codes can be used to alert users to high-cost products or to show the relative costs of products, for example on a scale of cheapest = $ to most expensive = $$$$$, the following could be used: Salbutamol inhaler, price: $; Beclomethasone inhaler, price: $$$. However, this type of price banding system may not always be accurate and the following should be borne in mind:

• Careful monitoring is needed to ensure that price has not moved from one band to another.
• It may be difficult to judge the price in the top band if it is too broad, i.e. if prices vary by a factor of 10 or more.


In other countries the NFC may choose to publish actual prices (as in the British national formulary).

Instead of showing individual unit cost of products, therapy cost comparison charts can be useful and informative for specific therapies. They can show the cost of a full course, or the daily and monthly cost of therapy with a number of alternatives being compared on the same graph (Figure 4.3 shows an example). The inclusion of such price comparison charts is advisable when wide ranges of alternatives are available for the treatment of common conditions such as infectious diseases and cardiovascular conditions or for pain control.

Scheduling status and availability codes

Scheduling status and availability codes can be indicated by the use of codes or abbreviations. For example:

Distribution code (Malawi national formulary, 1991):

C = central hospitals only;
D = district and central hospitals only;
H = health centres and all other levels of health institution.


Prescribing category code (British national formulary, 47th ed., 2004)

PoM = prescription only medicine.


Codes for procurement, such as catalogue numbers necessary for ordering from the central medical store, priority codes as defined in a VEN system (Vital, Essential, Necessary priority), or symbols indicating eligibility for re-imbursement can also be useful.

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