How to Develop a National Formulary Based on the WHO Model Formulary - A Practical Guide
(2004; 45 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAbbreviations
Open this folder and view contents1 INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2 OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL FORMULARY PROCESS
Close this folder3 DEVELOPING THE PRELIMINARY INFORMATION SECTION
View the documentDeveloping locally relevant introductory information
Open this folder and view contentsGeneral entries at the front of a national formulary
Open this folder and view contentsAdditional information at the front of the national formulary
View the documentAdapting the “General advice to prescribers” section of the WHO model formulary
Open this folder and view contents4 DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC INFORMATION AND MONOGRAPHS USING THE WHO MODEL FORMULARY
Open this folder and view contents5 ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Open this folder and view contents6 DEVELOPING SPECIFIC INFORMATION SECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents7 PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLEMENTATION
Open this folder and view contents8 EVALUATION
Open this folder and view contents9 REVIEW AND UPDATE
View the documentREFERENCES
 

Adapting the “General advice to prescribers” section of the WHO model formulary

This section of the WMF aims to point prescribers towards good prescribing practices and important factors that can influence the outcome of drug therapy.

It could be useful to include the whole of the WMF text for this section in the NF and to supplement it with relevant national information as mentioned above.

The local information inserted can be presented using a different text style so that the user can access it quickly in cases when local recommendations are not in agreement with WMF recommendations or editors wish to add emphasis to local text (see example in Box 3.2). However this may be confusing to readers, and a uniform style and agreement by the expert advisers on what to include in the final text is possibly a better solution.

Box 3.2. Addition of local information in “Prescription writing” section

Narcotics and controlled substances

 

The prescribing of a medicinal product that is liable to abuse requires special attention and may be subject to specific statutory requirements. Practitioners may need to be authorized to prescribe controlled substances; in such cases it might be necessary to indicate details of the authority on the prescription. In particular, the strength, directions and the quantity of the controlled substance to be dispensed should be stated clearly, with all quantities written in words as well as in figures to prevent alteration. Other details such as patient particulars and date should also be filled in carefully to avoid alteration.

WMF text

In Zimbabwe all prescriptions for narcotics must be hand written with the quantity of prescribed drug written in full words as well as with numbers and the prescription may be repeated on not more than two occasions. All other requirements for prescriptions also apply and must be filled completely. The pharmacist must keep a record of all dispensed narcotics and prescriptions and make it available for inspection by the Medicine Control Authority of Zimbabwe. Dangerous Drugs Regulations (S.I. 111/75) and Dangerous Drugs Ac [Chapter 15:02]

NF text
Note different font for national information

 

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