How to Develop a National Formulary Based on the WHO Model Formulary - A Practical Guide
(2004; 45 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAbbreviations
Open this folder and view contents1 INTRODUCTION
Close this folder2 OVERVIEW OF THE NATIONAL FORMULARY PROCESS
Open this folder and view contentsOrganization of the national formulary committee
View the documentAgreement on purpose, content, structure and format
View the documentFinancing
View the documentSelection of medicines to be included in the national formulary
View the documentDevelopment of the draft
View the documentReviewing and finalizing content
View the documentProduction, dissemination and implementation
View the documentEvaluation and review
Open this folder and view contents3 DEVELOPING THE PRELIMINARY INFORMATION SECTION
Open this folder and view contents4 DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC INFORMATION AND MONOGRAPHS USING THE WHO MODEL FORMULARY
Open this folder and view contents5 ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Open this folder and view contents6 DEVELOPING SPECIFIC INFORMATION SECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents7 PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLEMENTATION
Open this folder and view contents8 EVALUATION
Open this folder and view contents9 REVIEW AND UPDATE
View the documentREFERENCES
 

Selection of medicines to be included in the national formulary

One of the most important decisions to be made by the NFC is what medicines to include in the NF, or what is on the formulary list. The starting point for the formulary list should be the existing essential medicines list (EML). The NFC may consider the addition of selected medicines to this list based on clear criteria that reflect the main purpose of the NF.

In countries without any EML or other approved national medicine list, it will be necessary to gain some insight on drug needs and use for the compilation of the formulary list based on:

- national morbidity data to determine patterns of prevalent diseases;

- recommendations of appropriate national, regional or international clinical guidelines to link selection of medicines to evidence-based treatment guidelines;

- original research and review papers, particularly local research;

- the list of pharmaceuticals registered by the national drug regulatory authority and currently marketed in the country (to assess availability and cost); and

- available financial, human and health facility resources, and demographic, genetic and environmental factors.

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