WHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations - WHO Technical Report Series, No. 908 - Thirty-seventh Report
(2003; 148 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentWHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations
View the document1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. General policy
Open this folder and view contents3. Quality control - specifications and tests
View the document4. Quality control - international reference materials
Open this folder and view contents5. Quality control - national laboratories
Open this folder and view contents6. Quality assurance - good manufacturing practices
Open this folder and view contents7. Quality assurance - inspection
Open this folder and view contents8. Quality assurance - distribution and trade-related
Open this folder and view contents9. Quality assurance - risk analysis
Open this folder and view contents10. Quality assurance - drug supply
Open this folder and view contents11. Quality assurance - storage
View the document12. International Nonproprietary Names (INNs) programme
Open this folder and view contents13. Miscellaneous
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentReferences
View the documentAnnex 1 Recommendations on risk of transmitting animal spongiform encephalopathy agents via medicinal products
View the documentAnnex 2 The International Pharmacopoeia: revised concepts and future perspectives
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 3 Guidelines on Good Manufacturing Practices for radiopharmaceutical products
Close this folderAnnex 4 Good Manufacturing Practices for pharmaceutical products: main principles
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentGeneral considerations
View the documentGlossary
Close this folderQuality management in the drug industry: philosophy and essential elements1
View the document1. Quality assurance
View the document2. Good manufacturing practices for pharmaceutical products (GMP)
View the document3. Sanitation and hygiene
View the document4. Qualification and validation
View the document5. Complaints
View the document6. Product recalls
Open this folder and view contents7. Contract production and analysis
Open this folder and view contents8. Self-inspection and quality audits
Open this folder and view contents9. Personnel
View the document10. Training
View the document11. Personal hygiene
Close this folder12. Premises
View the documentGeneral
View the documentAncillary areas
View the documentStorage areas
View the documentWeighing areas
View the documentProduction areas
View the documentQuality control areas
View the document13. Equipment
Open this folder and view contents14. Materials
Open this folder and view contents15. Documentation
Open this folder and view contents16. Good practices in production
Open this folder and view contents17. Good practices in quality control
View the documentReferences
View the documentAnnex 5 Model certificate of Good Manufacturing Practices
View the documentAnnex 6 Guidance on Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP): inspection report
View the documentAnnex 7 Application of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) methodology to pharmaceuticals
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 8 Procedure for assessing the acceptability, in principle, of pharmaceutical products for purchase by United Nations agencies
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 9 Guide to good storage practices for pharmaceuticals1
View the documentBack cover
 
Storage areas

12.15 Storage areas should be of sufficient capacity to allow orderly storage of the various categories of materials and products with proper separation and segregation: starting and packaging materials, intermediates, bulk and finished products, products in quarantine, and released, rejected, returned or recalled products.

12.16 Storage areas should be designed or adapted to ensure good storage conditions. In particular, they should be clean, dry, sufficiently lit and maintained within acceptable temperature limits. Where special storage conditions are required (e.g. temperature, humidity) these should be provided, controlled, monitored and recorded where appropriate.

12.17 Receiving and dispatch bays should be separated and protect materials and products from the weather. Receiving areas should be designed and equipped to allow containers of incoming materials to be cleaned if necessary before storage.

12.18 Where quarantine status is ensured by storage in separate areas, these areas must be clearly marked and their access restricted to authorized personnel. Any system replacing the physical quarantine should give equivalent security.

12.19 Segregation should be provided for the storage of rejected, recalled, or returned materials or products.

12.20 Highly active and radioactive materials, narcotics, other dangerous drugs, and substances presenting special risks of abuse, fire or explosion should be stored in safe and secure areas.

12.21 Printed packaging materials are considered critical to the conformity of the pharmaceutical product to its labelling and special attention should be paid to sampling and the safe and secure storage of these materials.

12.22 There should normally be a separate sampling area for starting materials. (If sampling is performed in the storage area, it should be conducted in such a way as to prevent contamination or cross-contamination.)

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: August 29, 2014