WHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations - WHO Technical Report Series, No. 908 - Thirty-seventh Report
(2003; 148 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentWHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations
View the document1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. General policy
Open this folder and view contents3. Quality control - specifications and tests
View the document4. Quality control - international reference materials
Open this folder and view contents5. Quality control - national laboratories
Open this folder and view contents6. Quality assurance - good manufacturing practices
Open this folder and view contents7. Quality assurance - inspection
Open this folder and view contents8. Quality assurance - distribution and trade-related
Open this folder and view contents9. Quality assurance - risk analysis
Open this folder and view contents10. Quality assurance - drug supply
Open this folder and view contents11. Quality assurance - storage
View the document12. International Nonproprietary Names (INNs) programme
Open this folder and view contents13. Miscellaneous
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentReferences
View the documentAnnex 1 Recommendations on risk of transmitting animal spongiform encephalopathy agents via medicinal products
View the documentAnnex 2 The International Pharmacopoeia: revised concepts and future perspectives
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 3 Guidelines on Good Manufacturing Practices for radiopharmaceutical products
Close this folderAnnex 4 Good Manufacturing Practices for pharmaceutical products: main principles
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentGeneral considerations
View the documentGlossary
Open this folder and view contentsQuality management in the drug industry: philosophy and essential elements1
View the documentReferences
View the documentAnnex 5 Model certificate of Good Manufacturing Practices
View the documentAnnex 6 Guidance on Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP): inspection report
View the documentAnnex 7 Application of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) methodology to pharmaceuticals
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 8 Procedure for assessing the acceptability, in principle, of pharmaceutical products for purchase by United Nations agencies
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 9 Guide to good storage practices for pharmaceuticals1
View the documentBack cover
 

General considerations

Licensed pharmaceutical products (marketing authorization) should be manufactured only by licensed manufacturers (holders of a manufacturing authorization) whose activities are regularly inspected by competent national authorities. This guide to GMP shall be used as a standard to justify GMP status, which constitutes one of the elements of the WHO Certification Scheme on the Quality of Pharmaceutical Products Moving in International Commerce, through the assessment of applications for manufacturing authorizations and as a basis for the inspection of manufacturing facilities. It may also be used as training material for government drug inspectors, as well as for production, quality control and quality assurance personnel in the industry.

The guide is applicable to operations for the manufacture of drugs in their finished dosage forms, including large-scale processes in hospitals and the preparation of supplies for use in clinical trials.

The good practices outlined below are to be considered general guides1, and they may be adapted to meet individual needs. The equivalence of alternative approaches to quality assurance, however, should be validated. The guide as a whole does not cover safety aspects for the personnel engaged in manufacture or environmental protection: these are normally governed by national legislation. A new concept of hazard analysis related to the risks in production and personnel safety is also newly recommeded (Annex 7). The manufacturer should assure the safety of workers and take the necessary measures to prevent pollution of the external environment. International Nonproprietary Names (INNs) for pharmaceutical substances designated by WHO should be used when available, together with other designated names.

1 The word “should” in the text means a strong recommendation.

 

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