WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Close this folder5. Other relevant issues
Close this folder5.1. Ethical and legal considerations
View the document5.1.1. Intellectual property rights and benefits-sharing
View the document5.1.2. Threatened and endangered species
View the document5.2. Research needs
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

5.1.2. Threatened and endangered species

Medicinal plants that are protected by national and international laws, such as those listed in national "red" lists, may be collected only by relevant permission according to national and/or international laws. The provisions of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) must be complied with. Endangered medicinal plant species must be sourced only in accordance with national and/or regional legislation.

When medicinal plant materials from threatened, endangered or protected medicinal plant species are obtained through cultivation, they should be accompanied by appropriate documentation in accordance with national and/or regional regulations, to certify that no such medicinal plant materials collected from the wild are included.

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