WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Close this folder4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4.1. Post-harvest processing
View the document4.2. Bulk packaging and labelling
View the document4.3. Storage and transportation
Open this folder and view contents4.4. Equipment
View the document4.5. Quality assurance
View the document4.6. Documentation
Close this folder4.7. Personnel (growers, collectors, producers, handlers, processors)
View the document4.7.1. General
View the document4.7.2. Health, hygiene and sanitation
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

4.7.2. Health, hygiene and sanitation

All production of medicinal plant materials by agriculture and collection should conform to national and/or regional regulations on safety, materials handling, sanitation and hygiene.

All those involved in the handling and processing of cultivated or collected medicinal plants should in all processing procedures comply with national and/or regional regulations on hygiene.

All personnel should be protected from contact with toxic or potentially allergenic herbs by means of adequate protective clothing, including gloves.

Health status

All personnel known, or suspected, to be suffering from or to be a carrier of a disease or illness likely to be transmitted through medicinal plant material, should not be allowed to enter any harvest, production or processing area if there is a likelihood of their contaminating medicinal plant materials. Any persons suffering from diseases or symptoms of illness should immediately report to the management. A medical examination of personnel should be carried out if clinically or epidemiologically indicated.

Illness and injuries

All personnel with open wounds, inflammations or skin diseases should be suspended from work or required to wear protective clothing and gloves until full recovery. Persons suffering from known airborne or food-borne communicable diseases, including dysentery and diarrhoea, should be suspended from work in all areas of production and processing, in accordance with local and/or national regulations.

Health conditions that should be reported to the management for consideration regarding medical examination and/or possible exclusion from handling of medicinal plant materials include: jaundice, diarrhoea, vomiting, fever, sore throat with fever, visibly infected lesions (boils, cuts, etc.) and discharges from the ear, nose or eye. Any personnel who have cuts or wounds and are permitted to continue working should cover their injuries with suitable waterproof dressings.

Personal cleanliness

Personnel who handle medicinal plant materials should maintain a high degree of personal cleanliness, and, where appropriate, wear suitable protective clothing and gloves, including head covering and footwear.

Personnel should always wash their hands at the start of handling activities, after using the toilet, and after handling medicinal plant materials or any contaminated material.

Personal behaviour

Smoking and eating should not be permitted in medicinal plant processing areas. Personnel who handle medicinal plant materials should refrain from behaviours that could result in contamination of the materials, for example, spitting, sneezing or coughing over unprotected materials.

Personal effects such as jewellery, watches or other items should not be worn or brought into areas where medicinal plant materials are handled if they pose a threat to the safety or quality of the materials.

Visitors

Visitors to processing and handling areas should wear appropriate protective clothing and adhere to all of the personal hygiene provisions mentioned above.

 

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