WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Close this folder4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4.1. Post-harvest processing
View the document4.2. Bulk packaging and labelling
View the document4.3. Storage and transportation
Open this folder and view contents4.4. Equipment
View the document4.5. Quality assurance
View the document4.6. Documentation
Open this folder and view contents4.7. Personnel (growers, collectors, producers, handlers, processors)
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

4.6. Documentation

Standard operating procedures should be adopted and documented. All processes and procedures involved in the production of medicinal plant materials and the dates on which they are carried out should be documented. An example of a cultivation record is provided in Annex 5. The types of information that should be collected include:

♦ seeds and other propagation materials

♦ propagation

♦ cultivation or collection site

♦ crop rotation at the site

♦ cultivation

♦ application of fertilizers, growth regulators, pesticides and herbicides

♦ unusual circumstances that may influence the quality (including chemical composition) of the medicinal plant materials (e.g. extreme weather conditions, exposure to hazardous substances and other contaminants, or pest outbreaks)

♦ harvest or collection

♦ all processing

♦ transportation

♦ storage

♦ application of fumigation agents.


Multiple sets of good herbarium specimens should be prepared and preserved for confirmation of plant identity and reference use. A photographic record (including film, video, or digital images) of the cultivation or collection site and the medicinal plants under cultivation or collection should be made, whenever possible.

All agreements between the grower or collector, processor and purchaser, and intellectual property and benefit-sharing agreements should be recorded.

Batch numbers should unambiguously and clearly identify all batches from each cultivation or collection area. Assignment of batch numbers should take place at an early stage of production. Collected and cultivated medicinal plant materials should carry different batch numbers.

Where applicable, the results of audits should be documented in an audit report which contains copies of all documents, analysis reports, and local, national and/or regional regulations, and which are stored according to their requirements.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: March 20, 2014