WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Close this folder4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4.1. Post-harvest processing
View the document4.2. Bulk packaging and labelling
View the document4.3. Storage and transportation
Open this folder and view contents4.4. Equipment
View the document4.5. Quality assurance
View the document4.6. Documentation
Open this folder and view contents4.7. Personnel (growers, collectors, producers, handlers, processors)
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

4.3. Storage and transportation

Conveyances used for transporting bulk medicinal plant materials from the place of production to storage for processing should be cleaned between loads. Bulk transport, such as ship or rail cars, should be cleaned and, where appropriate, well ventilated to remove moisture from medicinal plant materials and to prevent condensation.

Organically grown medicinal plant materials should be stored and transported separately or in a manner that ensures their integrity.

Appropriate security measures should be applied to the storage and transport of medicinal plant materials that are potentially toxic or poisonous.

Whenever required and when possible, fresh medicinal plant materials should be stored at appropriate low temperatures, ideally at 2-8 °C; frozen products should be stored at less than -20 °C.

Fumigation against pest infestation should be carried out only when necessary, and should be carried out by licensed or trained personnel. Only registered chemical agents authorized by the regulatory authorities of the source country and the countries of intended end-use should be used. All fumigation, fumigation agents, and dates of application should be documented. When freezing or saturated steam is used for pest control, the humidity of the materials should be checked after treatment.

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