WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Close this folder4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4.1. Post-harvest processing
View the document4.2. Bulk packaging and labelling
View the document4.3. Storage and transportation
Open this folder and view contents4.4. Equipment
View the document4.5. Quality assurance
View the document4.6. Documentation
Open this folder and view contents4.7. Personnel (growers, collectors, producers, handlers, processors)
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

4.2. Bulk packaging and labelling

Processed medicinal plant materials should be packaged as quickly as possible to prevent deterioration of the product and to protect against unnecessary exposure to potential pest attacks and other sources of contamination.

Continuous in-process quality control measures should be implemented to eliminate substandard materials, contaminants and foreign matter prior to and during the final stages of packaging. Processed medicinal plant materials should be packaged in clean, dry boxes, sacks, bags or other containers in accordance with standard operating procedures and national and/or regional regulations of the producer and the end-user countries. Materials used for packaging should be non-polluting, clean, dry and in undamaged condition and should conform to the quality requirements for the medicinal plant materials concerned. Fragile medicinal plant materials should be packaged in rigid containers. Whenever possible, the packaging used should be agreed upon between supplier and buyer.

Reusable packaging material such as jute sacks and mesh bags should be well cleaned (disinfected) and thoroughly dried prior to reuse, so as to avoid contamination by previous contents. All packaging materials should be stored in a clean and dry place that is free from pests and inaccessible to livestock, domestic animals and other sources of contamination.

A label affixed to the packaging should clearly indicate the scientific name of the medicinal plant, the plant part, the place of origin (cultivation or collection site), the cultivation or collection date and the names of the grower/collector and the processor, and quantitative information. The label should also contain information indicating quality approval and comply with other national and/or regional labelling requirements.

The label should bear a number that clearly identifies the production batch. Additional information about the production and quality parameters of the medicinal plant materials may be added in a separate certificate, which is clearly linked to the package carrying the same batch number.

Records should be kept of batch packaging, and should include the product name, place of origin, batch number, weight, assignment number and date. The records should be retained for a period of three years or as required by national and/or regional authorities.

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