WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Close this folder3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
View the document3.1. Permission to collect
View the document3.2. Technical planning
View the document3.3. Selection of medicinal plants for collection
View the document3.4. Collection
View the document3.5. Personnel
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants

This section describes the general strategies and basic methods for small- and large-scale collection of fresh medicinal plant materials. Collection practices should ensure the long-term survival of wild populations and their associated habitats. Management plans for collection should provide a framework for setting sustainable harvest levels and describe appropriate collection practices that are suitable for each medicinal plant species and plant part used (roots, leaves, fruits, etc.). Collection of medicinal plants raises a number of complex environmental and social issues that must be addressed locally on a case-by-case basis. It is acknowledged that these issues vary widely from region to region and cannot be fully covered by these guidelines.

More guidance can be found in the WHO/IUCN/WWF Guidelines on the conservation of medicinal plants (12), which are currently under revision to deal comprehensively with the sustainable use and conservation of medicinal plants.

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