WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Close this folder3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
View the document3.1. Permission to collect
View the document3.2. Technical planning
View the document3.3. Selection of medicinal plants for collection
View the document3.4. Collection
View the document3.5. Personnel
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

3.5. Personnel

Local experts responsible for the field collection should have formal or informal practical education and training in plant sciences and have practical experience in fieldwork. They should be responsible for training any collectors who lack sufficient technical knowledge to perform the various tasks involved in the plant collection process. They are also responsible for the supervision of workers and the full documentation of the work performed. Field personnel should have adequate botanical training, and be able to recognize medicinal plants by their common names and, ideally, by their scientific (Latin) names.

Local experts should serve as knowledgeable links between non-local people and local communities and collectors. All collectors and local workers involved in the collection operation should have sufficient knowledge of the species targeted for collection and be able to distinguish target species from botanically related and/or morphologically similar species. Collectors should also receive instructions on all issues relevant to the protection of the environment and the conservation of plant species, as well as the social benefits of sustainable collection of medicinal plants.

The collection team should take measures to ensure the welfare and safety of staff and local communities during all stages of medicinal plant sourcing and trade. All personnel must be protected from toxic and dermatitis-causing plants, poisonous animals and disease-carrying insects. Appropriate protective clothing, including gloves, should be worn when necessary.

For further information, see section 4.7.

 

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