WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Close this folder3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
View the document3.1. Permission to collect
View the document3.2. Technical planning
View the document3.3. Selection of medicinal plants for collection
View the document3.4. Collection
View the document3.5. Personnel
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

3.3. Selection of medicinal plants for collection

Where applicable, the species or botanical variety selected for collection should be the same as that specified in the national pharmacopoeia or recommended by other authoritative national documents of the end-user's country, as the source for the herbal medicines concerned. In the absence of such national documents, the selection of species or botanical varieties specified in the pharmacopoeia or other authoritative documents of other countries should be considered. In the case of newly introduced medicinal plants, the species or botanical variety selected for collection should be identified and documented as the source material used or described in traditional medicine in original countries.

Collectors of medicinal plants and producers of medicinal plant materials and herbal medicines should prepare botanical specimens for submission to regional or national herbaria for authentication. The voucher specimens should be retained for a sufficient period of time, and should be preserved under proper conditions. The name of the botanist or other experts who provided the botanical identification or authentication should be recorded. If the medicinal plant is not well known to the community, then documentation of the botanical identity should be recorded and maintained.

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