WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Close this folder2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents2.1. Identification/authentication of cultivated medicinal plants
View the document2.2. Seeds and other propagation materials
Close this folder2.3. Cultivation
View the document2.3.1. Site selection
View the document2.3.2. Ecological environment and social impact
View the document2.3.3. Climate
View the document2.3.4. Soil
View the document2.3.5. Irrigation and drainage
View the document2.3.6. Plant maintenance and protection
View the document2.4. Harvest
View the document2.5. Personnel
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

2.3.5. Irrigation and drainage

Irrigation and drainage should be controlled and carried out in accordance with the needs of the individual medicinal plant species during its various stages of growth. Water used for irrigation purposes should comply with local, regional and/or national quality standards. Care should be exercised to ensure that the plants under cultivation are neither over- nor under-watered.

In the choice of irrigation, as a general rule, the health impact of the different types of irrigation (various forms of surface, sub-surface or overhead irrigation), particularly on the risks of increased vector-borne disease transmission, must be taken into account.

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