WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Close this folder2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents2.1. Identification/authentication of cultivated medicinal plants
View the document2.2. Seeds and other propagation materials
Close this folder2.3. Cultivation
View the document2.3.1. Site selection
View the document2.3.2. Ecological environment and social impact
View the document2.3.3. Climate
View the document2.3.4. Soil
View the document2.3.5. Irrigation and drainage
View the document2.3.6. Plant maintenance and protection
View the document2.4. Harvest
View the document2.5. Personnel
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

2.3.2. Ecological environment and social impact

The cultivation of medicinal plants may affect the ecological balance and, in particular, the genetic diversity of the flora and fauna in surrounding habitats. The quality and growth of medicinal plants can also be affected by other plants, other living organisms and by human activities. The introduction of non-indigenous medicinal plant species into cultivation may have a detrimental impact on the biological and ecological balance of the region. The ecological impact of cultivation activities should be monitored over time, where practical.

The social impact of cultivation on local communities should be examined to ensure that negative impacts on local livelihood are avoided. In terms of local income- earning opportunities, small-scale cultivation is often preferable to large-scale production, in particular if small-scale farmers are organized to market their products jointly. If large-scale medicinal plant cultivation is or has been established, care should be taken that local communities benefit directly from, for example, fair wages, equal employment opportunities and capital reinvestment.

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