WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Close this folder2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents2.1. Identification/authentication of cultivated medicinal plants
View the document2.2. Seeds and other propagation materials
Close this folder2.3. Cultivation
View the document2.3.1. Site selection
View the document2.3.2. Ecological environment and social impact
View the document2.3.3. Climate
View the document2.3.4. Soil
View the document2.3.5. Irrigation and drainage
View the document2.3.6. Plant maintenance and protection
View the document2.4. Harvest
View the document2.5. Personnel
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

2.3.1. Site selection

Medicinal plant materials derived from the same species can show significant differences in quality when cultivated at different sites, owing to the influence of soil, climate and other factors. These differences may relate to physical appearance or to variations in their constituents, the biosynthesis of which may be affected by extrinsic environmental conditions, including ecological and geographical variables, and should be taken into consideration.

Risks of contamination as a result of pollution of the soil, air or water by hazardous chemicals should be avoided. The impact of past land uses on the cultivation site, including the planting of previous crops and any applications of plant protection products, should be evaluated.

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