WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Close this folder1. General introduction
View the document1.1. Background
View the document1.2. Objectives
View the document1.3. Structure
Close this folder1.4. Glossary
View the document1.4.1. Terms relating to herbal medicines:
View the document1.4.2. Terms relating to medicinal plant cultivation and collection activities:
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

1.4.2. Terms relating to medicinal plant cultivation and collection activities:

The definitions below have been adapted from terms included in the glossary compiled by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), available at the time of preparation of these guidelines.3

3 The glossary can be found at http://www.fao.org/glossary/


Erosion

The process whereby water or wind moves soil from one location to another. Types of erosion are (1) sheet and rill - a general washing away of a thin uniform sheet of soil, or removal of soil in many small channels or incisions caused by rainfall or irrigation run-off; (2) gully - channels or incisions cut by concentrated water run-off after heavy rains; (3) ephemeral - a water-worn, short-lived or seasonal incision, wider, deeper and longer than a rill, but shallower and smaller than a gully; and (4) wind - the carrying away of dust and sediment by wind in areas of high prevailing winds or low annual rainfall.

Integrated pest management (IPM)

The careful integration of a number of available pest-control techniques that discourage pest-population development and keep pesticides and other interventions to levels that are economically justified and safe for human health and the environment. IPM emphasizes the growth of a healthy crop with the least disruption to agro-ecosystems, thereby encouraging natural pest-control mechanisms.

Landrace

In plant genetic resources, an early, cultivated form of a crop species, evolved from a wild population, and generally composed of a heterogeneous mixture of genotypes.

Plant genetic resources

The reproductive or vegetative propagating material of: (1) cultivated varieties (cultivars) in current use and newly developed varieties; (2) obsolete cultivars; (3) primitive cultivars (landraces); (4) wild and weed species, near relatives of cultivated varieties; and (5) special genetic stocks (including elite and current breeders' lines and mutants).

Propagule

Any structure capable of giving rise to a new plant by asexual or sexual reproduction, including bulbils, leaf buds, etc.

Standard operating procedure (SOP)

An authorized written procedure giving instructions for performing an operation.

Sustainable use

The use of components of biological diversity in a way and at a rate that does not lead to the long-term decline of biological diversity, thereby maintaining its potential to meet the needs and aspirations of present and future generations.

 

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