WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Close this folderAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the document1. Introduction
View the document2. General
View the document3. Quality assurance
View the document4. Personnel and education
View the document5. Building and facilities
View the document6. Equipment
View the document7. Documentation
View the document8. Seeds and propagation material
View the document9. Cultivation
View the document10. Collection
View the document11. Harvest
View the document12. Primary processing
View the document13. Packaging
View the document14. Storage and distribution
View the documentGlossary
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

9. Cultivation

Different Standing Operating Procedures may be acceptable depending on whether conventional or organic methods of cultivation are employed. However, care should be taken to avoid any environmental impact. The principles of good crop husbandry must be followed including appropriate rotation of crops.

9.1 Soil and fertilisation

9.1.1 Medicinal plants should not be grown in soil contaminated with sludge, heavy metals, residues, plant protection products or other chemicals etc. Any chemicals used in the growth or protection of the crop should be kept to a minimum.

9.1.2 Manure applied should be thoroughly composted and should be void of human faeces.

9.1.3 All other fertilising agents should be applied sparingly and in accordance with the needs of the particular species. Fertilisers should be applied in such a manner as to minimise leaching.


9.2 Irrigation

9.2.1 Irrigation should be controlled and carried out according to the needs of the medicinal plant.

9.2.2 Water used in irrigation should comply with regional/national quality standards.


9.3 Crop maintenance and plant protection.

9.3.1 Tillage should be adapted to plant growth and requirements.

9.3.2 Pesticide and herbicide applications should be avoided as far as possible. When necessary approved plant protection products should be applied at the minimum effective level in accordance with the recommendations from the manufacturer and authorities. The application should be carried out only by qualified staff using approved equipment. The minimum interval between such treatment and harvest time must be stipulated by the buyer or be consistent with recommendations from the manufacturer of the plant protection product. Regional and/or national regulations on maximum residue limits in the European Pharmacopoeia, European Directives, Codex Alimentarius etc should be complied with.

 

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