WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Close this folderAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the document1. Introduction
View the document2. General
View the document3. Quality assurance
View the document4. Personnel and education
View the document5. Building and facilities
View the document6. Equipment
View the document7. Documentation
View the document8. Seeds and propagation material
View the document9. Cultivation
View the document10. Collection
View the document11. Harvest
View the document12. Primary processing
View the document13. Packaging
View the document14. Storage and distribution
View the documentGlossary
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

8. Seeds and propagation material

8.1 Seeds should be verified botanically, indicating genus, species, variety/cultivar/chemotype and origin and should be traceable. The same applies to vegetatively propagated medicinal plants. Seeds and/or vegetatively propagated medicinal plants used in organic production have to be certified as organic. The starting material should be as free as possible from pests and diseases in order to guarantee healthy plant growth. Species resistant or tolerant to disease should preferably be used.

8.2 The presence of different species, varieties or different plant parts has to be controlled during the entire production process, and such adulteration should be avoided. The use of genetically modified medicinal plants or seeds must comply with regional and/or national regulation

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