WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Close this folderAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the document1. Introduction
View the document2. General
View the document3. Quality assurance
View the document4. Personnel and education
View the document5. Building and facilities
View the document6. Equipment
View the document7. Documentation
View the document8. Seeds and propagation material
View the document9. Cultivation
View the document10. Collection
View the document11. Harvest
View the document12. Primary processing
View the document13. Packaging
View the document14. Storage and distribution
View the documentGlossary
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

4. Personnel and education

4.1 All primary processing procedures should fully conform with regional and/or national guidelines on food hygiene and personnel entrusted with handling of medicinal plants/herbal drugs should be required to have a high degree of personal hygiene (including personnel working in the field) and have received adequate training regarding their hygiene responsibilities.

4.2 The welfare of all staff involved in growing and processing should be ensured.

4.3 Personnel must be protected from contact with toxic or potentially allergenic medicinal plants/herbal drugs by means of adequate protective clothes.

4.4 Persons suffering from known infectious diseases transmittable via food, including diarrhoea, or being transmitters of such diseases, must be suspended from areas where they are in contact with medicinal plants/herbal drugs, according to regional and/or national regulations.

4.5 Persons with open wounds, inflammations and skin-infections should be suspended from areas where the plant processing takes place or should have to wear appropriate protective clothing/gloves until their complete recuperation.

4.6 Personnel should receive adequate botanical training before performing tasks that require this knowledge.

4.7 Collectors must have sufficient knowledge of the plant they have to collect. This includes identification, characteristics and habitat requirements such as shade, humidity, soil etc. The collectors must be able to differentiate between the collected species and botanically related and/or morphologically similar species to avoid any risk to public health. Collectors should have sufficient knowledge about the best time to harvest and harvesting technique and the importance of primary processing to guarantee the best possible quality.

4.8 If collectors are without sufficient knowledge, a local supervisor should guarantee the education, supervision and documentation.

4.9 It is advisable to educate all personnel dealing with the medicinal plant/herbal drug and all those engaged in its cultivation regarding cultivation techniques including the appropriate use of herbicides and pesticides.

4.10 Collectors of medicinal plants/herbal drugs should be instructed on all issues relevant to the protection of the environment and conservation of plant species. This will include information on regulations related to protected species.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: October 7, 2014