WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Close this folderAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the document1. Introduction
View the document2. General
View the document3. Quality assurance
View the document4. Personnel and education
View the document5. Building and facilities
View the document6. Equipment
View the document7. Documentation
View the document8. Seeds and propagation material
View the document9. Cultivation
View the document10. Collection
View the document11. Harvest
View the document12. Primary processing
View the document13. Packaging
View the document14. Storage and distribution
View the documentGlossary
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

12. Primary processing

12.1 Primary processing includes washing, cutting before drying, fumigation, freezing, distillation, drying, etc. All of these processes must conform to regional and/or national regulations.

12.2 On arrival at the processing facility the harvested medicinal plant/herbal drug has to be promptly unloaded and unpacked. Prior to processing the material should not be exposed directly to the sun, except in cases where there is a specific need, and must be protected from rainfall

12.3 In the case of natural open air drying, the medicinal plant/herbal drug must be spread out in a thin layer. In order to secure adequate air circulation, the drying frames must be located at a sufficient distance from the ground. Drying directly on the ground or under direct exposure to the sunlight should be avoided unless specifically required. Attempts must be made to achieve uniform drying of the medicinal plant/herbal drug and thus avoid mould formation.

12.4 Except in the case of open air drying, the drying conditions such as temperature, duration etc must be selected taking into consideration the medicinal plant part such as root, leaf or flower and the nature of its active constituent, such as essential oils. The source of heat in direct drying should be limited to butane, propane or natural gas. Individual conditions must be recorded in detail.

12.5 All materials must be inspected and where necessary sieved in order to eliminate sub-standard product and foreign bodies. Sieves must be maintained in a clean state and should be serviced regularly.

12.6 Clearly marked waste-bins should be available, emptied daily and cleaned.

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