WHO Guidelines on Good Agricultural and Collection Practices (GACP) for Medicinal Plants
(2003; 80 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. General introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Good agricultural practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents3. Good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents4. Common technical aspects of good agricultural practices for medicinal plants and good collection practices for medicinal plants
Open this folder and view contents5. Other relevant issues
View the documentBibliography
View the documentAnnex 1. Good Agricultural Practice for Traditional Chinese Medicinal Materials, People's Republic of China
Close this folderAnnex 2. Points to Consider on Good Agricultural and Collection Practice for Starting Materials of Herbal Origin
View the document1. Introduction
View the document2. General
View the document3. Quality assurance
View the document4. Personnel and education
View the document5. Building and facilities
View the document6. Equipment
View the document7. Documentation
View the document8. Seeds and propagation material
View the document9. Cultivation
View the document10. Collection
View the document11. Harvest
View the document12. Primary processing
View the document13. Packaging
View the document14. Storage and distribution
View the documentGlossary
View the documentAnnex 3. Good Agricultural and Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants (GACP), Japan
View the documentAnnex 4. A model structure for monographs on good agricultural practices for specific medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 5. Sample record for cultivated medicinal plants
View the documentAnnex 6. Participants in the WHO Consultation on Good Agricultural and Field Collection Practices for Medicinal Plants
 

11. Harvest

11.1 Medicinal plants/herbal drugs should be harvested when they are at the best possible quality for the proposed use.

11.2 Damaged plants or parts plants need to be excluded.

11.3 Medicinal plants/herbal drugs should be harvested under the best possible conditions avoiding wet soil, dew, rain or exceptionally high air humidity. If harvesting occurs in wet conditions possible adverse effects on the medicinal plant/herbal drug due to increased moisture levels should be counteracted.

11.4 Cutting devices or harvesters must be adjusted such that contamination from soil particles is reduced to a minimum.

11.5 The harvested medicinal plant/herbal drug should not come into direct contact with the soil. It must be promptly collected and transported in dry, clean conditions.

11.6 During harvesting, care should be taken to ensure that no toxic weeds mix with harvested medicinal plants/herbal drugs.

11.7 All containers used during harvesting must be clean and free of contamination from previous harvests. When containers are not in use, they must be kept in dry conditions free of pests and inaccessible to mice/rodents, livestock and domestic animals.

11.8 Mechanical damage and compacting of the harvested medicinal plant/herbal drug that would result in undesirable quality changes must be avoided. In this respect, attention must be paid to

- overfilling of the sacks,
- stacking up of sacks.


11.9 Freshly harvested medicinal plants/herbal drugs must be delivered as quickly as possible to the processing facility in order to prevent thermal degradation.

11.10 The harvested crop must be protected from pests, mice/rodents, livestock and domestic animals. Any pest control measures taken should be documented.

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