Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference of Drug Regulatory Authorities (ICDRA) - Hong Kong, China, 24 - 27 June 2002
(2002; 166 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentAbbreviations and acronyms used in this report
Open this folder and view contentsOpening ceremony
Open this folder and view contentsHerbal medicines
Open this folder and view contentsKeynote address
Open this folder and view contentsSafety of blood-derived products
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial resistance - new initiatives
Open this folder and view contentsHarmonization I
Open this folder and view contentsHarmonization II
Open this folder and view contentsProtection of trial subjects in clinical trials
Open this folder and view contentsRegulating biotechnology products
Open this folder and view contentsRegulatory challenges: health sector reform and drug regulatory capacity
Open this folder and view contentsAccess to drugs and vaccines I
Open this folder and view contentsAccess to drugs and vaccines II
Open this folder and view contentsCounterfeit pharmaceutical products
Open this folder and view contentsHomoeopathy
Open this folder and view contentsSafety monitoring
Close this folderE-Commerce
View the documentDrug promotion and sales through the Internet
View the documentMedicines and the Internet - regulatory approaches in Singapore
View the documentPharmaceuticals and e-commerce: the Netherlands
View the documentRecommendations
Open this folder and view contentsCurrent topics
Open this folder and view contentsRegulatory challenges of new technologies
View the documentList of participants
View the documentBack cover
 

Recommendations

1. Patient/consumer protection should be the first priority of regulatory authorities in their approach to e-commerce. National authorities should endeavour to ensure that patients have the same level of protection whether they purchase pharmaceuticals through legitimate Internet sites or through the traditional channels.

2. Regulatory authorities should improve the information contents of their websites and establish appropriate programmes, including mass media campaigns, aimed at providing unbiased information and warn the public on the possible risks of unregulated pharmaceutical ecommerce.

These programmes must be designed in a way that ensures that they effectively reach health professionals and consumers.

3. National authorities should establish and encourage the use of simple mechanisms for consumers and health professionals to report illegal sites and negative experience they have had with e-commerce.

4. WHO should establish and maintain a list of national focal points and circulate it to all regulatory authorities in order to foster international collaboration in combating illegal pharmaceutical e-commerce.

5. WHO should continue to create opportunities, through international meetings of national regulatory officials, for discussing and foster awareness on the public-health issues related to pharmaceutical e-commerce.

6. Progress should be reported back to the ICDRA.

 

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