Adherence to Long-Term Therapies - Evidence for Action
(2003; 211 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentScientific writers
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentTake-home messages
Open this folder and view contentsSection I - Setting the scene
Open this folder and view contentsSection II - Improving adherence rates: guidance for countries
Close this folderSection III - Disease-Specific Reviews
Open this folder and view contentsChapter VII - Asthma
Open this folder and view contentsChapter VIII - Cancer (Palliative care)
Open this folder and view contentsChapter IX - Depression
Open this folder and view contentsChapter X - Diabetes
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XI - Epilepsy
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XII - Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XIII - Hypertension
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XIV - Tobacco smoking cessation
Close this folderChapter XV - Tuberculosis
View the document1. Definition of adherence
View the document2. Factors that influence adherence to treatment
View the document3. Prediction of adherence
View the document4. Strategies to improve adherence to treatment
View the document5. Questions for future research
View the document6. References
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexes
Open this folder and view contentsWhere to find a copy of this book
 

Chapter XV - Tuberculosis

The World Health Organization (WHO) declared tuberculosis (TB) a global public health emergency in 1993 and since then has intensified its efforts to control the disease worldwide (1). Despite these efforts, there were an estimated 8.7 million new cases of TB worldwide during 2000 (2). The rapidly increasing rates of HIV infection, combined with escalating poverty and the collapse of public health services in many settings have contributed to this serious situation (3).

The therapeutic regimens recommended by WHO have been shown to be highly effective for both preventing and treating TB (4), but poor adherence to anti-tuberculosis medication is a major barrier to its global control (2,5,6).Tuberculosis is a communicable disease, thus poor adherence to a prescribed treatment increases the risks of morbidity, mortality and drug resistance at both the individual and community levels.

The purpose of this chapter is to describe the current insights into patients' treatment behaviour and the methods adopted by health providers to enhance adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment. This has been done with the aim of contributing to the generation of knowledge leading to the production of guidelines for enhancing adherence to prescribed medication in patients receiving long-term care.

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