Adherence to Long-Term Therapies - Evidence for Action
(2003; 211 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentScientific writers
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentTake-home messages
Open this folder and view contentsSection I - Setting the scene
Open this folder and view contentsSection II - Improving adherence rates: guidance for countries
Close this folderSection III - Disease-Specific Reviews
Open this folder and view contentsChapter VII - Asthma
Open this folder and view contentsChapter VIII - Cancer (Palliative care)
Open this folder and view contentsChapter IX - Depression
Open this folder and view contentsChapter X - Diabetes
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XI - Epilepsy
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XII - Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XIII - Hypertension
Close this folderChapter XIV - Tobacco smoking cessation
View the document1. The burden of tobacco smoking
View the document2. Clinical guidelines and therapies available for tobacco smoking cessation
View the document3. Definitions
View the document4. Epidemiology of adherence
View the document5. Factors affecting adherence
View the document6. Interventions for improving adherence
View the document7. Cost, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of adherence
View the document8. Conclusions
View the document9. References
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XV - Tuberculosis
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexes
Open this folder and view contentsWhere to find a copy of this book
 

7. Cost, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of adherence

There are few data available concerning the health economics of adherence to smoking cessation therapy. Westman et al. (7) reported that 4 weeks of high-dose and 2 weeks of low-dose nicotine treatment were cost-effective and sufficient to enhance cessation. This 6-week intervention achieved 6-month abstinence rates comparable with those of studies offering 12 or more weeks of treatment.

There is some debate as to whether it is necessary to have health professionals available in the clinic providing supportive counselling (7,53,54). However, the literature search suggested that providing minimal or moderate support resulted in higher adherence rates than providing no support. A separate discussion is required to decide which of the professionals in the health care team should be responsible for the provision of this support.

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