Adherence to Long-Term Therapies - Evidence for Action
(2003; 211 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentScientific writers
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentTake-home messages
Open this folder and view contentsSection I - Setting the scene
Open this folder and view contentsSection II - Improving adherence rates: guidance for countries
Close this folderSection III - Disease-Specific Reviews
Close this folderChapter VII - Asthma
View the document1. Defining nonadherence to asthma therapy
View the document2. Rates of adherence to inhaled corticosteroids and other drugs for the prevention of asthma
View the document3. Forms of nonadherence
View the document4. Factors associated with adherence to asthma treatment
View the document5. Adherence in special populations
View the document6. Interventions to improve adherence to asthma therapy
View the document7. Discussion
View the document8. Conclusions
View the document9. References
Open this folder and view contentsChapter VIII - Cancer (Palliative care)
Open this folder and view contentsChapter IX - Depression
Open this folder and view contentsChapter X - Diabetes
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XI - Epilepsy
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XII - Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XIII - Hypertension
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XIV - Tobacco smoking cessation
Open this folder and view contentsChapter XV - Tuberculosis
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexes
Open this folder and view contentsWhere to find a copy of this book
 

8. Conclusions

Nonadherence to regimens for asthma treatment may have several causes including inadequate knowledge and skill on the part of the patient, and inadequate awareness of the problem, or lack of skill to address it, on the part of the health professional. Patients must have a basic understanding of their illness and its treatment if we are to expect even minimal adherence. Achievement of adherence requires considerable effort from both the patient and caregiver. To perform the daily tasks necessary for successful control of their asthma, patients must be well motivated and convinced that their own behaviour will result in improved health, a concept referred to as self-efficacy. Simply giving information to patients is unlikely to change behaviour; health care providers must understand the psychological principles that underlie self-management training and comprehend that motivating patients requires more than informing them briefly about the prescription that has just been written. At the core of these principles is the need to establish treatment goals that can be embraced both by health professionals and patients in a partnership that requires regular and reciprocal communication. Patients will not perform the work necessary to achieve goals they do not understand or do not view as necessary and important. Once appropriate goals have been established, most patients require assistance in determining how to evaluate their changing symptoms and how to use their written action plan to make effective decisions about daily self-management behaviour.

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