Adherence to Long-Term Therapies - Evidence for Action
(2003; 211 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the documentScientific writers
View the documentIntroduction
View the documentTake-home messages
Open this folder and view contentsSection I - Setting the scene
Close this folderSection II - Improving adherence rates: guidance for countries
Open this folder and view contentsChapter IV - Lessons learned
Open this folder and view contentsChapter V - Towards the solution
Close this folderChapter VI - How can improved adherence be translated into health and economic benefits?
View the document1. Diabetes
View the document2. Hypertension
View the document3. Asthma
View the document4. References
Open this folder and view contentsSection III - Disease-Specific Reviews
Open this folder and view contentsAnnexes
Open this folder and view contentsWhere to find a copy of this book
 

Chapter VI - How can improved adherence be translated into health and economic benefits?

Many studies have reported institutional changes in costs following changes in adherence rates. Some studies have shown that initial investments in interventions to enhance adherence are fully recovered within a few years and recurrent costs are fully covered by savings. These "cost-saving interventions" are firmly linked to the prevention of disease relapses, crises and/or complications.

From a societal point of view, most interventions aimed at enhancing adherence have been shown to result in cost-savings, due to the improvement in patients' quality of life, indirect costs avoided and increased productivity. Such savings are not reflected in economic studies with an institutional perspective.

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