Network for Monitoring the Impact of Globalization and TRIPS on Access to Medicines, Meeting Report, 19-21 February 2001, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand - Health Economics and Drugs Series No. 011
(2002; 67 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
Open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
View the document2. Highlights of opening address of Dr Supachai Panitchpakdi
Close this folder3. 1Globalization, TRIPS and Access to Pharmaceuticals
View the documentA new era in global trade
View the documentWTO Agreements
View the documentImplementation and dispute settlement
Close this folderKey requirements of the TRIPS Agreement
View the documentPatent protection
View the documentRights conferred
View the documentTransitional arrangements
View the documentPublic health and TRIPS
View the documentPatentability
View the documentGeneric drugs
View the documentCompulsory licensing
View the documentParallel imports
View the documentTRIPS-plus provisions
View the documentNon-WTO Members
View the documentEvaluating impacts of trade agreements
Open this folder and view contentsWHO Perspectives on Access to Drugs
View the document4. Further Reading
View the document5. Template of selected model indicators for studying the impact of globalization and TRIPS on access to medicines
Open this folder and view contents6. Selected indicators for studying the impact of globalization and TRIPS on access to medicines
View the document7. The Collaborating Centres
 

Public health and TRIPS

International conventions before TRIPS did not specify minimum standards for patents. Over 40 countries provided no patent protection for pharmaceuticals, many provided only process and not product patents, and the duration of patents was much less than 20 years in many countries.

From the health sector’s perspective, intellectual property standards, including those specified in TRIPS, should take protection of public health into account. However, current standards - historically derived from those of developed countries - are not necessarily appropriate for countries struggling to meet health and development needs. Developing countries can therefore use the flexibility of TRIPS provisions and its safeguards to protect public health.

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