Expand Document  |  Expand Chapter  |  Full TOC  |  Printable HTML version
Annual Report 2001 - Essential Drugs and Medicines Policy: Extending the Evidence Base
(2002; 12 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPOLICY: CREATING A SHARED VISION FOR ACTION
View the documentACCESS: MORE MEDICINES FOR LESS MONEY
View the documentQUALITY AND SAFETY: REDUCING RISK AND PROMOTING EFFECTIVENESS
View the documentRATIONAL SELECTION AND USE: KNOWING WHEN TO USE WHAT
 

Annual Report 2001 - Essential Drugs and Medicines Policy: Extending the Evidence Base

WHO

© World Health Organization 2002.

All rights reserved. Publications of the World Health Organization can be obtained from Marketing and Dissemination, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia,
1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland (tel: +41 22 791 2476; fax: +41 22 791 4857; email: bookorders@who.int).

The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Dotted lines on maps represent approximate border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.

The World Health Organization does not warrant that the information contained in this publication is complete and correct and shall not be liable for any damages incurred as a result of its use.

The WHO Medicines Strategy 2000-2003 identifies policy, access, quality and safety, and rational use as its four major objectives. In 2001, our medicines activities focused on extending the evidence base in each of these four areas. We applied that evidence to help countries improve access to affordable medicines of good quality, and ensure that those medicines were used to secure maximum health impact.

Our support to countries and regions included significant capacity-building, with courses and training for health professionals all around the world. Training was often carried out with collaborating institutions. All support was carefully tailored to meet country and regional needs (Box 1).

In parallel to regional and country activities, we provided guidance in support of major new medicines initiatives. This included technical advice to the European Commission, and to the Global Fund to Fight Tuberculosis, AIDS and Malaria. Concurrently, we continued to work with the wider UN family, nongovernmental organizations and foundations.

In 2002, major impetus is on public financing of medicines and improving the capacity of supply systems to deliver medicines of assured quality. Efforts to further broaden our partnership base will also continue, so that medicines issues are tackled rapidly, using the full range of expertise available globally.

 

Dr Anarfi Asamoa-Baah, Executive Director Health Technology and Pharmaceuticals

Dr Jonathan Quick, Director Essential Drugs and Medicines Policy

Box 1

Principal area of support to countries and regions

In 2001, support was provided to 132 countries, or 66% of WHO Member States. Top areas of assistance were:

 

• national drug policy development - 84 countries
• medicines regulation and quality assurance - 65 countries
• rational medicines use by health professionals - 62 countries.

The relative emphasis of support varied among the regions:

 

• African Region: national drug policy development and access
• Americas Region: information for medicines regulation
• Eastern Mediterranean Region: medicines regulation and quality assurance
• European Region: medicines financing mechanisms
• South-East Asia Region: rational use of medicines by health professionals

 

• Western Pacific Region: medicines regulation and quality assurance.
 

 

to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: August 29, 2014