Integrating Public Health Concerns into Patent Legislation in Developing Countries
(2000; 140 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentTHE SOUTH CENTRE
View the documentFOREWORD
View the documentACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
View the documentGLOSSARY*
Open this folder and view contentsI. INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contentsII. PATENTABLE SUBJECT MATTER
Open this folder and view contentsIII. SCOPE OF CLAIMS
Open this folder and view contentsIV. PATENTABILITY REQUIREMENTS
Open this folder and view contentsV. SPECIAL CASES IN PHARMACEUTICALS
Open this folder and view contentsVI. DISCLOSURE
Open this folder and view contentsVII. EXCEPTIONS TO EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS
Open this folder and view contentsVIII. EXAMINATION AND OBSERVATION PROCEDURES
Open this folder and view contentsIX. CLAIMS INTERPRETATION
Close this folderX. COMPULSORY LICENSING
View the documentX.1 Grounds for Granting Compulsory Licenses
View the documentX.2 Imports/Exports
Open this folder and view contentsX.3 Registration
View the documentXI. FINAL REMARKS
View the documentREFERENCES
View the documentBACK COVER
 

X. COMPULSORY LICENSING

Compulsory licensing enables a government to license to a company, government agency or other party the right to use a patent without the title holder’s consent. A compulsory license must be granted by a competent authority to a designated person, who should generally compensate the title-holder through payment of a remuneration. Compulsory licenses do not deny patent holders the right to act against non-licensed parties.

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