Integrating Public Health Concerns into Patent Legislation in Developing Countries
(2000; 140 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentTHE SOUTH CENTRE
View the documentFOREWORD
View the documentACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
View the documentGLOSSARY*
Open this folder and view contentsI. INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contentsII. PATENTABLE SUBJECT MATTER
Open this folder and view contentsIII. SCOPE OF CLAIMS
Open this folder and view contentsIV. PATENTABILITY REQUIREMENTS
Open this folder and view contentsV. SPECIAL CASES IN PHARMACEUTICALS
Open this folder and view contentsVI. DISCLOSURE
Close this folderVII. EXCEPTIONS TO EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS
Open this folder and view contentsVII.1 Experimental Use
Open this folder and view contentsVII.2 Early Working
Open this folder and view contentsVII.3 Parallel Imports
Close this folderVII.4 Individual Prescriptions
View the documentVII.4.1 Options - Individual Prescriptions
Open this folder and view contentsVIII. EXAMINATION AND OBSERVATION PROCEDURES
Open this folder and view contentsIX. CLAIMS INTERPRETATION
Open this folder and view contentsX. COMPULSORY LICENSING
View the documentXI. FINAL REMARKS
View the documentREFERENCES
View the documentBACK COVER
 

VII.4 Individual Prescriptions

Patent laws commonly exclude from the effects of the patent rights, medicines prepared for an individual case in a pharmacy or by a medical professional141. This exclusion, though not specifically provided for, may be deemed permitted under article 30 of the TRIPs Agreement.

141 From a public health perspective, however, the proliferation of individual prescriptions may be risky, to the extent that there are no quality assurance mechanisms to protect the consumers.

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