Research Guidelines for Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Herbal Medicines
(1993; 94 pages)
Table of Contents
View the documentFOREWORD
Open this folder and view contents1. INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS IN HERBAL MEDICINE RESEARCH
Open this folder and view contents3. RESEARCH STUDIES
Close this folder4. USING THE GUIDELINES
Open this folder and view contentsA. GUIDELINES FOR QUALITY SPECIFICATIONS OF PLANT MATERIALS AND PREPARATIONS
Close this folderB. GUIDELINES FOR PHARMACODYNAMIC AND GENERAL PHARMACOLOGICAL STUDIES OF HERBAL MEDICINES
View the documentANIMALS
View the documentADMINISTRATION
Open this folder and view contentsC. GUIDELINES FOR TOXICITY INVESTIGATION OF HERBAL MEDICINES
Open this folder and view contentsANNEXES
View the documentNOTES
View the documentBIBLIOGRAPHY
View the documentSELECTED WHO PUBLICATIONS OF RELATED INTEREST
 

ADMINISTRATION

Route of administration

Since oral dosage forms of herbal medicines are usually used clinically, the oral route of administration is ordinarily the most suitable for use with test animals. Additional routes may be used to approximate the intended route of administration in man.

Frequency of administration

Ordinarily, doses selected for a study should be established by means of a dose-response relationship but since such relationships often cannot be demonstrated with herbal medicines in whole animals, it may be sufficient to select one or more doses that provide a desired effect.

Selection of doses for animal studies should be in accordance with customary clinical doses.

Control group

It is essential that all studies include a negative (vehicle only) control group of animals and, if possible, a positive control group, that is, a group of animals in which the effect of a drug known to be positive is examined.

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