Guidelines for the Appropriate use of Herbal Medicines
(1998; 88 pages)
Table of Contents
View the documentForeword
Open this folder and view contents1. Introduction
Open this folder and view contents2. Goals and objectives of the guidelines
View the document3. Definitions
Close this folder4. National policy development
View the document4.1 Process for the development of a policy on herbal medicine
View the document4.2 Issues to be included in the policy
Open this folder and view contents5. Development of a national programme on herbal medicines
Open this folder and view contents6. Regulation of practitioners
Open this folder and view contents7. Regulation of the manufacture and distribution of medicinal herbal products
Open this folder and view contents8. Regulation of herbal medicines
View the document9. Use of the guidelines
View the documentAnnex 1: Report of the meeting of the working group on herbal medicines
View the documentAnnex 2: List of temporary advisers, consultants, observers and secretariat
View the documentAnnex 3: Agenda
View the documentAnnex 4: Opening Speech of Dr S.T. Han, WHO Regional Director for the Western Pacific Region Working Group on Herbal Medicines, 8 December 1997, Manila, Philippines
View the documentAnnex 5: Closing Remarks of Dr S.T. Han, WHO Regional Director for the Western Pacific Working Group on Herbal Medicines, 12 December 1997, Manila, Philippines
View the documentReferences
 

4.1 Process for the development of a policy on herbal medicine

A systematic review of the current status of herbal medicine in individual countries and its role in maintaining health will be necessary for policy development.

The national health authority is the most appropriate body to take the lead in developing the national policy. It can be assisted by a national advisory committee, supported by subcommittees to advise on specific aspects, if required. Where necessary, expert opinions can be obtained from international agencies and other countries. In formulating the policy, consideration should be given to the existing health care system, socioeconomic situation, local tradition and culture. The approach should be practical.

A strategic plan should be developed as part of overall planning. Following identification of problems and benefits, priorities can be set and objectives better defined. The adoption of a strategy is very important as it may involve a choice between several approaches to address the issues. Consultation with the communities and interested parties concerned is essential.

The contents of the draft policy document should be discussed with institutions within and outside government and with the private sector before it is finalized and submitted for formal endorsement.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: June 25, 2014