Guidelines for the Management of Sexually Transmitted Infections. February 2004
(2004; 88 pages)
Table of Contents
View the documentPREFACE
Open this folder and view contents1. INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2. TREATMENT OF STI-ASSOCIATED SYNDROMES
Open this folder and view contents3. TREATMENT OF SPECIFIC INFECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents4. KEY CONSIDERATIONS UNDERLYING TREATMENTS
Close this folder5. PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN STI CASE MANAGEMENT
View the document5.1. The Public Health package for STI prevention and care
View the document5.2. Clinical considerations
View the document5.3. Education for primary prevention
View the document5.4. Education and counselling during an STI consultation
View the document5.5. Notification and management of sexual partners
View the document5.6. Access to services
Open this folder and view contents6. CHILDREN6, ADOLESCENTS AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
View the documentANNEX. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
 

5.2. Clinical considerations

The feasibility of providing STI case management must be assured within any health care setting, whether within the public or private sector. An essential component will be privacy for consultation. Depending on source of care there may also be need to provide facilities such as an examination table or couch with adequate lighting, gloves, syringes, specula, sterilization equipment and laboratory supplies. Thus, for individuals seeking evaluation for an STI appropriate care consists of the following components:

• History taking, including behavioural, demographic and medical risk assessment

• Physical examination is essential, particularly of the genital area, which in some cultures may be sensitive

• Establishment of a diagnosis, syndromic or laboratory based

• Curative or palliative therapy, using the most effective antimicrobial for the pathogen, at the first port of call of the patient

• Patient education and counselling (where counselling services are available), including information on:

• compliance
• nature of infection
• importance of partner notification and treatment therefore
• risk reduction and prevention of further STI transmission
• HIV risk perception and assessment

• Case reporting

• Clinical follow up when appropriate and feasible

• Screening for asymptomatic infection (where feasible)

There are four major components in STI control:

• education of individuals at risk on modes of disease transmission and means of reducing the risk of transmission

• detection of infection in asymptomatic subjects and in subjects who are symptomatic but unlikely to seek diagnostic and therapeutic services

• effective management of infected individuals

• treatment and education of the sexual partners of infected individuals.

The prevention of STI is based primarily on changing the sexual behaviours that put people at risk and on promoting the use of condoms.

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