Guidelines for the Management of Sexually Transmitted Infections. February 2004
(2004; 88 pages)
Table of Contents
View the documentPREFACE
Open this folder and view contents1. INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2. TREATMENT OF STI-ASSOCIATED SYNDROMES
Close this folder3. TREATMENT OF SPECIFIC INFECTIONS
Close this folder3.1. Gonococcal infections
View the documentUncomplicated anogenital infection
View the documentDisseminated infection
View the documentGonococcal ophthalmia
Open this folder and view contents3.2. Chlamydia trachomatis infections (other than lymphogranuloma venereum)
View the document3.3. Lymphogranuloma venereum
Open this folder and view contents3.4. Syphilis
View the document3.5. Chancroid
View the document3.6. Granuloma inguinale (Donovanosis)
Open this folder and view contents3.7. Genital herpes infections
Open this folder and view contents3.8. Venereal warts
View the document3.9. Trichomonas vaginalis infections
Open this folder and view contents3.10. Bacterial vaginosis
Open this folder and view contents3.11. Candidiasis
View the document3.12. Scabies
View the document3.13. Phthiriasis (pediculosis pubis)
Open this folder and view contents4. KEY CONSIDERATIONS UNDERLYING TREATMENTS
Open this folder and view contents5. PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN STI CASE MANAGEMENT
Open this folder and view contents6. CHILDREN6, ADOLESCENTS AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
View the documentANNEX. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
 

3.1. Gonococcal infections

A large proportion of gonococcal isolates worldwide are now resistant to penicillins, tetracyclines, and other older antimicrobial agents, which can therefore no longer be recommended for the treatment of gonorrhoea.

It is important to monitor local in vitro susceptibility, as well as the clinical efficacy of recommended regimens.

Note

In general it is recommended that concurrent anti-chlamydia therapy be given to all patients with gonorrhoea, as described in the section on chlamydia infections, since dual infection is common. This does not apply to patients in whom a specific diagnosis of C. trachomatis has been excluded by a laboratory test.

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