Guidelines for the Management of Sexually Transmitted Infections. February 2004
(2004; 88 pages)
Table of Contents
View the documentPREFACE
Open this folder and view contents1. INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2. TREATMENT OF STI-ASSOCIATED SYNDROMES
Close this folder3. TREATMENT OF SPECIFIC INFECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents3.1. Gonococcal infections
Open this folder and view contents3.2. Chlamydia trachomatis infections (other than lymphogranuloma venereum)
View the document3.3. Lymphogranuloma venereum
Open this folder and view contents3.4. Syphilis
View the document3.5. Chancroid
View the document3.6. Granuloma inguinale (Donovanosis)
Close this folder3.7. Genital herpes infections
View the documentFirst clinical episode
View the documentRecurrent infections
View the documentSuppressive therapy
View the documentHerpes in pregnancy
View the documentHerpes and HIV co-infection
Open this folder and view contents3.8. Venereal warts
View the document3.9. Trichomonas vaginalis infections
Open this folder and view contents3.10. Bacterial vaginosis
Open this folder and view contents3.11. Candidiasis
View the document3.12. Scabies
View the document3.13. Phthiriasis (pediculosis pubis)
Open this folder and view contents4. KEY CONSIDERATIONS UNDERLYING TREATMENTS
Open this folder and view contents5. PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN STI CASE MANAGEMENT
Open this folder and view contents6. CHILDREN6, ADOLESCENTS AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
View the documentANNEX. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
 

Herpes and HIV co-infection

In people whose immunity is deficient, persistent and/or severe mucocutaneous ulcerations may occur, often involving large areas of perianal, scrotal or penile skin. The lesions may be painful and atypical, making a clinical diagnosis difficult. The natural history of herpes sores may become altered. Most lesions of herpes in HIV infected persons will respond to acyclovir, but the dose may have to be increased and treatment given for longer than the standard recommended period. Subsequently, patients may benefit from chronic suppressive therapy. In some cases the patients may develop thymidine-kinase deficient mutants for which standard antiviral therapy becomes ineffective.

The recommended regimen in severe herpes simplex lesions with co-infection with HIV is acyclovir 400mg orally 3-5 times daily until clinical resolution is attained.

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