Guidelines for the Management of Sexually Transmitted Infections. February 2004
(2004; 88 pages)
Table of Contents
View the documentPREFACE
Open this folder and view contents1. INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2. TREATMENT OF STI-ASSOCIATED SYNDROMES
Close this folder3. TREATMENT OF SPECIFIC INFECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents3.1. Gonococcal infections
Open this folder and view contents3.2. Chlamydia trachomatis infections (other than lymphogranuloma venereum)
View the document3.3. Lymphogranuloma venereum
Open this folder and view contents3.4. Syphilis
View the document3.5. Chancroid
View the document3.6. Granuloma inguinale (Donovanosis)
Open this folder and view contents3.7. Genital herpes infections
Open this folder and view contents3.8. Venereal warts
View the document3.9. Trichomonas vaginalis infections
Open this folder and view contents3.10. Bacterial vaginosis
Open this folder and view contents3.11. Candidiasis
View the document3.12. Scabies
View the document3.13. Phthiriasis (pediculosis pubis)
Open this folder and view contents4. KEY CONSIDERATIONS UNDERLYING TREATMENTS
Open this folder and view contents5. PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN STI CASE MANAGEMENT
Open this folder and view contents6. CHILDREN6, ADOLESCENTS AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
View the documentANNEX. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
 

3.5. Chancroid

Owing to widespread resistance in all geographical areas, tetracycline and penicillins have no place in the treatment of chancroid. Single-dose therapy with anti-microbials are the preferred regimen.

Recommended regimen

• ciprofloxacin, 500mg orally, twice daily for 3 days

OR

• erythromycin base, 500mg orally, 4 times daily for 7 days

OR

• azithromycin, 1g orally, as a single dose.

Alternative regimens

• ceftriaxone, 250mg by intramuscular injection, as a single dose

Management of lesions

No special treatment is required. Ulcerative lesions should be kept clean, and fluctuant lymph nodes should be aspirated as required through the surrounding healthy skin. Incision and drainage or excision of nodes may delay healing and is not recommended.

Follow-up

All patients should be followed up until there is clear evidence of improvement or cure. In patients infected with HIV, treatment may appear less effective, but this may be due to co-infection with genital herpes or syphilis. Since chancroid and HIV infection are closely associated and therapeutic failure is likely to be seen with increasing frequency, patients should be followed up weekly until there is clear evidence of improvement.

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