Guidelines for the Management of Sexually Transmitted Infections. February 2004
(2004; 88 pages)
Table of Contents
View the documentPREFACE
Open this folder and view contents1. INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents2. TREATMENT OF STI-ASSOCIATED SYNDROMES
Close this folder3. TREATMENT OF SPECIFIC INFECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents3.1. Gonococcal infections
Open this folder and view contents3.2. Chlamydia trachomatis infections (other than lymphogranuloma venereum)
View the document3.3. Lymphogranuloma venereum
Open this folder and view contents3.4. Syphilis
View the document3.5. Chancroid
View the document3.6. Granuloma inguinale (Donovanosis)
Open this folder and view contents3.7. Genital herpes infections
Open this folder and view contents3.8. Venereal warts
View the document3.9. Trichomonas vaginalis infections
Open this folder and view contents3.10. Bacterial vaginosis
Close this folder3.11. Candidiasis
View the documentVulvovaginal candidiasis
View the documentVulvovaginal candidiasis in pregnancy
View the documentVulvovaginal candidiasis and HIV infection
View the documentBalanoposthitis
View the document3.12. Scabies
View the document3.13. Phthiriasis (pediculosis pubis)
Open this folder and view contents4. KEY CONSIDERATIONS UNDERLYING TREATMENTS
Open this folder and view contents5. PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN STI CASE MANAGEMENT
Open this folder and view contents6. CHILDREN6, ADOLESCENTS AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
View the documentANNEX. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
 

3.11. Candidiasis

Vulvo-vaginal candidiasis usually is not acquired through sexual intercourse. Although treatment of sexual partners is not recommended it may be considered for women who have recurrent infection. A minority of male sex partners may have balanitis, which is characterised by erythema (redness) of the glans penis.

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