Guidelines for the Management of Sexually Transmitted Infections. February 2004
(2004; 88 pages)
Table of Contents
View the documentPREFACE
Open this folder and view contents1. INTRODUCTION
Close this folder2. TREATMENT OF STI-ASSOCIATED SYNDROMES
Open this folder and view contents2.1. Urethral discharge
Open this folder and view contents2.2. Genital ulcer
View the document2.3. Scrotal swelling
Close this folder2.4. Vaginal discharge
View the documentCervical infection
View the documentVaginal infection
View the document2.5. Lower abdominal pain
View the document2.6. Neonatal conjunctivitis
Open this folder and view contents3. TREATMENT OF SPECIFIC INFECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents4. KEY CONSIDERATIONS UNDERLYING TREATMENTS
Open this folder and view contents5. PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN STI CASE MANAGEMENT
Open this folder and view contents6. CHILDREN6, ADOLESCENTS AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
View the documentANNEX. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
 

Cervical infection

Recommended syndromic treatment

• therapy for uncomplicated gonorrhoea (for details see section 3.1)

PLUS

• therapy for chlamydia (for details see section 3.2)

AT A GLANCE

Cervical infection

For details, see section 3.1 and 3.2

Drug options for Gonorrhoea

Drug options for Chlamydia

Ciprofloxacin

Doxycycline

Azithromycin

Azithromycin

Ceftriaxone

 

Cefixime

 

Spectinomycin

 

Alternatives

Alternatives

Kanamycin

Amoxycillin

Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole

Ofloxacin

 

Erythromycin (if Tetracycline is contraindicated)

 

Tetracycline

Note

• Tetracyclines are contraindicated in pregnancy.

• Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole should only be used in areas where this combination has been shown to be effective against uncomplicated gonorrhoea.

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