Guidelines for the Management of Sexually Transmitted Infections. February 2004
(2004; 88 pages)
Table of Contents
View the documentPREFACE
Open this folder and view contents1. INTRODUCTION
Close this folder2. TREATMENT OF STI-ASSOCIATED SYNDROMES
Close this folder2.1. Urethral discharge
View the document2.1.1. Persistent or recurrent urethral discharge
Open this folder and view contents2.2. Genital ulcer
View the document2.3. Scrotal swelling
Open this folder and view contents2.4. Vaginal discharge
View the document2.5. Lower abdominal pain
View the document2.6. Neonatal conjunctivitis
Open this folder and view contents3. TREATMENT OF SPECIFIC INFECTIONS
Open this folder and view contents4. KEY CONSIDERATIONS UNDERLYING TREATMENTS
Open this folder and view contents5. PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN STI CASE MANAGEMENT
Open this folder and view contents6. CHILDREN6, ADOLESCENTS AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
View the documentANNEX. LIST OF PARTICIPANTS
 

2.1.1. Persistent or recurrent urethral discharge

Persistent or recurrent symptoms of urethritis may be due to drug resistance, poor compliance or re-infection. In some cases there may be infection with Trichomonas vaginalis (TV).

There is new evidence suggesting high prevalence of TV in men with urethral discharge in some geographical settings. Where symptoms persist or recur after adequate treatment for gonorrhoea and chlamydia in index patient and partner(s), the patient should be treated for TV, if the local epidemiological pattern so indicates. If the symptoms still persist at follow up the patient must be referred.

For details see section 3.9.


FIGURE 2. PERSISTENT/RECURRENT URETHRAL DISCHARGE IN MEN

N.B. This flowchart assumes effective therapy for Gonorrhoea and Chlamydia to have been received and taken by the patient prior to this consultation.

to previous section
to next section
 
 
The WHO Essential Medicines and Health Products Information Portal was designed and is maintained by Human Info NGO. Last updated: December 1, 2019