Traditional Practitioners as Primary Health Care Workers
(1995; 146 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentI. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
View the documentII. INTRODUCTION AND NEED FOR THE STUDY
View the documentIII. OBJECTIVES
View the documentIV. METHODOLOGY
View the documentV. REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE
Open this folder and view contentsVI. DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS
View the documentVII. RESULTS
View the documentVIII. LESSONS LEARNED AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Close this folderIX. SUMMARY OF GUIDELINES FOR TRAINING
View the documentSTEP I: Planning for the Training
View the documentSTEP II: Determining Content for Training
View the documentSTEP III: Determining the Training Methods
View the documentSTEP IV: Selecting Training Materials
View the documentSTEP V: Training the Trainers
View the documentSTEP VI: Evaluating the Training
View the documentREFERENCES
View the documentAPPENDICES
 

STEP IV: Selecting Training Materials

"A picture is worth a thousand words." Visual aids, such as posters, flash cards, videos, and films can enhance the learning process many times. Be sure to select them with an eye to the background of the students.

Review the needs for audio-visual materials in the curriculum

Audio visual materials are very useful, both for classroom training, and for use by THPs when educating community groups. Classroom materials may include training manuals, diagrams and posters, flip charts, films, slides and videos. Health education materials for community use may include posters, flip charts, and flannelgraphs.

Select AV materials that already exist locally

This may reduce costs. You can also adapt existing materials to the culture, environment and specific needs of the training group. Be sure to take into account education level, language issues, suitability of drawings, relevance of material, and religious and cultural beliefs and values.

Prepare your own materials

Uselow-cost local materials and use pictures as often as possible. Keep words and numbers at a minimum. Use colours and graphs and keep the display easy to understand. Be sure that any human figures reflect the dress of the community and look friendly and approachable. Take care to illustrate technical points accurately.

Pretest materials before using

This will give you a chance to adapt materials to a local audience to avoid misinterpretation by a target group. Be sure that the language is clear, the material interesting, the message comes across, and the drawings are understood.

Use AV materials effectively

Use a variety of AV materials to illustrate main points. Processes like delivering a baby may be better shown by using a film or video. When possible, make visual aids interactive by asking the trainees to explain or discuss what they see.

For examples of visual materials used in THP training programmes see Appendices 4, 5, 6, and 7.

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