Traditional Practitioners as Primary Health Care Workers
(1995; 146 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentI. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
View the documentII. INTRODUCTION AND NEED FOR THE STUDY
View the documentIII. OBJECTIVES
View the documentIV. METHODOLOGY
View the documentV. REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE
Open this folder and view contentsVI. DESCRIPTION OF PROJECTS
View the documentVII. RESULTS
View the documentVIII. LESSONS LEARNED AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Close this folderIX. SUMMARY OF GUIDELINES FOR TRAINING
View the documentSTEP I: Planning for the Training
View the documentSTEP II: Determining Content for Training
View the documentSTEP III: Determining the Training Methods
View the documentSTEP IV: Selecting Training Materials
View the documentSTEP V: Training the Trainers
View the documentSTEP VI: Evaluating the Training
View the documentREFERENCES
View the documentAPPENDICES
 

STEP II: Determining Content for Training

Three factors should determine the content of training programmes: what the community wants and needs to improve their health; what THPs want to learn; and what the health agency's policies and priorities are for training THPs.

Information from the informal survey described in the last section can be used to identify key areas of knowledge and skills that THPs will need to provide PHC services. Using THP input increases their level of commitment to the programme. In the same way, agency policies must be taken into account to ensure that training is consistent with them.

Identify what trainees need to know

Be sure to prioritize skills and information into what must be taught and what might be useful. Consult existing training manuals published by WHO and other agencies to identify specific functions and responsibilities that TBAs, herbalists, and other types of traditional practitioners have already been taught.

Train to alleviate social and economic need

Improved literacy is a social skill often requested by THPs who may have had little formal schooling. As most health practitioners are not paid by health agencies who provide their training, it is helpful to teach income-producing skills as part of the programme.

Write specific training objectives

Clear objectives detailing skills, behaviours, and attitudes to be taught are a must to any successful training programme. When this is done, the programme runs more smoothly because both trainers and trainees know what results are expected. When staff have agreed on programme content, written performance objectives can act as a way to measure progress.

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