Guidelines for Training Traditional Health Practitioners in Primary Health Care
(1995; 86 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentINTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP I: PLANNING FOR THE TRAINING
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP II: DETERMINING THE CONTENT FOR TRAINING
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP III: DETERMINING THE TRAINING METHODS
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP IV: SELECTING TRAINING MATERIALS
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP V: TRAINING THE TRAINERS
Close this folderSTEP VI: EVALUATING THE TRAINING
View the documentA. PURPOSE OF EVALUATION IN TRAINING PROGRAMMES
View the documentB. WHO BENEFITS FROM EVALUATION
View the documentC. EVALUATE THE PROGRESS OF A TRAINING PROJECT
View the documentD. METHODS OF ASSESSMENT
View the documentE. ASSESS THE PERFORMANCE OF TRAINERS
View the documentF. EVALUATE THE OUTCOMES OF A TRAINING PROGRAMME
View the documentG. VALUE OF A PARTICIPATORY EVALUATION
View the documentCONCLUSION
View the documentAPPENDICES
View the documentREFERENCES
 

STEP VI: EVALUATING THE TRAINING

The word "evaluation" sends chills down the spines of some people who may have endured negative experiences with tests or examinations at school. Or they might have been harshly judged by their supervisors in a job setting. Evaluation need not be a negative experience. If an atmosphere is created where people, working as a team, use evaluation as a tool to see how they are doing and to find ways to increase their success in reaching their goals, then evaluation can be a very positive process which will benefit all who participate in it.

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