Guidelines for Training Traditional Health Practitioners in Primary Health Care
(1995; 86 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentINTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE
Close this folderSTEP I: PLANNING FOR THE TRAINING
View the documentA. REVIEW EXISTING POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
View the documentB. INVOLVE THPs AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS IN THE PLANNING
View the documentC. IDENTIFY THE HEALTH CONDITIONS OF COMMUNITIES
View the documentD. IDENTIFY THE TYPES OF HEALTH PRACTITIONERS THAT EXIST
View the documentE. IDENTIFY SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF HEALTH PRACTITIONERS
View the documentF. USE A STANDARD FORMAT TO DESIGN THE CURRICULUM
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP II: DETERMINING THE CONTENT FOR TRAINING
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP III: DETERMINING THE TRAINING METHODS
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP IV: SELECTING TRAINING MATERIALS
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP V: TRAINING THE TRAINERS
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP VI: EVALUATING THE TRAINING
View the documentCONCLUSION
View the documentAPPENDICES
View the documentREFERENCES
 

D. IDENTIFY THE TYPES OF HEALTH PRACTITIONERS THAT EXIST

In the four projects studied, there were two general categories of traditional healers:

1. Traditional birth attendants, or midwives

The functions of TBA's have traditionally been to assist pregnant women with birthing and sometimes to provide prenatal care. With training, these functions can be greatly expanded to include services such as routine pre- and post-natal care, nutrition, referrals, record keeping and family planning. The specific content of these duties is described more fully in Step II.

2. Herbalists, bonesetters, and spiritualists

The functions of herbalists, bonesetters, spiritualists, and other types of healers are much more varied, depending upon the specific type of healing performed and the culture and geographic region in which they practice. Herbalists and bonesetters use a wide variety of medicinal plants and other remedies. Spiritualists draw from a variety of faiths and spiritual beliefs. And many of these practitioners will combine one or more of these practices.

A common denominator among many healers is their use of medicinal plants in their treatments. This common factor can be used as a base for improving their skills in identifying herbal plants, collecting and preserving specimens in sanitary ways, and prescribing and utilizing medicines in safe and consistent ways.

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