Guidelines for Training Traditional Health Practitioners in Primary Health Care
(1995; 86 pages) View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentINTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE
Close this folderSTEP I: PLANNING FOR THE TRAINING
View the documentA. REVIEW EXISTING POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
View the documentB. INVOLVE THPs AND COMMUNITY MEMBERS IN THE PLANNING
View the documentC. IDENTIFY THE HEALTH CONDITIONS OF COMMUNITIES
View the documentD. IDENTIFY THE TYPES OF HEALTH PRACTITIONERS THAT EXIST
View the documentE. IDENTIFY SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF HEALTH PRACTITIONERS
View the documentF. USE A STANDARD FORMAT TO DESIGN THE CURRICULUM
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP II: DETERMINING THE CONTENT FOR TRAINING
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP III: DETERMINING THE TRAINING METHODS
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP IV: SELECTING TRAINING MATERIALS
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP V: TRAINING THE TRAINERS
Open this folder and view contentsSTEP VI: EVALUATING THE TRAINING
View the documentCONCLUSION
View the documentAPPENDICES
View the documentREFERENCES
 

A. REVIEW EXISTING POLICIES AND REGULATIONS

Government Ministries of Health, NGOs, and other health agencies may have already established policies for how THPs should be trained and practice in their jurisdictions. Carefully review any documents that describe such policies and any regulations or guidelines that illustrate the scope or limitations of activities which THPs can carry out in PHC programmes. These policies should be used as guidelines when developing the content and other aspects of the training programme.

For example, the content of the four training projects evaluated in Ghana, Mexico, and Bangladesh was directly influenced by legal regulations and local government policies and priorities. The Government of Bangladesh, for example, had well-established policies for training TBAs, although there was some flexibility allowed for NGOs to modify this training according to conditions in different regions, as long as the major intent of the government policy was adhered to. Ghana, by contrast, had not yet formed specific policies to regulate the training of herbalists. In Mexico, on the other hand, the Government strongly advocated and supported this type of training.

Because the training of herbalists, bonesetters and spiritual practitioners is relatively new compared with the training of TBAs, existing policies for the former group are less well defined.

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