WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Close this folderSubcutaneous fungal infections
View the documentSporotrichosis
View the documentMycetoma
View the documentChromomycosis
View the documentSubcutaneous zygomycosis
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Subcutaneous zygomycosis

Subcutaneous zygomycosis, which is typically seen in children and adolescents, results from infection with a pathogenic fungus, Basidiobolus haptosporus. It first develops as a localized lesion, usually on the thighs or buttocks, and it spreads slowly to form a hard, painless, non-pitting mass involving the cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues. The mass is shiny and tense initially, but may later become ulcerated. Subcutaneous zygomycosis has been reported in southeastern Asia and Africa. In Africa, India, South America and the West Indies, lesions similar to those of subcutaneous zygomycosis, but occurring on the face, may be caused by the fungus Conidiobolus coronatus.

Treatment

Remission sometimes occurs spontaneously. Most cases respond satisfactorily to potassium iodide (see Subcutaneous fungal infections - Sporotrichosis). Oral ketoconazole or itraconazole, 200-400 mg daily, may also be effective.

 

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