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WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Open this folder and view contentsScaling diseases
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Tropical ulcers

Tropical ulcers are necrotic painful lesions that result from a mixed bacterial infection. They are common in hot humid tropical or subtropical areas, where they occur on the lower legs or feet of children and young adults. Typically, they have a raised, slightly undermined border and a yellowish necrotic base. Tropical ulcers may heal spontaneously but in some instances extension may occur, resulting in deep lesions which penetrate into muscles, tendons and bone. Untreated, tropical ulcers can result in much scar tissue and disability.

Management

Daily dressing with 0.65% aluminium diacetate, 0.01% potassium permanganate or 0.005% silver nitrate solution is often sufficient to arrest progression of localized ulcers and promote healing. The lesions should also be treated with procaine benzylpenicillin, 600000 IU daily (25 000-50000 IU/kg for children under 12 years) for 2-4 weeks.

 

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