WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Skin Diseases
(1997; 132 pages) [French] [Spanish] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
View the documentPreface
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsParasitic infections
Open this folder and view contentsInsect and arachnid bites and stings
Open this folder and view contentsSuperficial fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsSubcutaneous fungal infections
Open this folder and view contentsBacterial infections
Open this folder and view contentsViral infections
Open this folder and view contentsEczematous diseases
Close this folderScaling diseases
View the documentIchthyosis
View the documentXerosis
Open this folder and view contentsPapulosquamous diseases
View the documentCutaneous reactions to drugs
Open this folder and view contentsPigmentary disorders
Open this folder and view contentsPremalignant lesions and malignant tumours
Open this folder and view contentsPhotodermatoses
Open this folder and view contentsBullous dermatoses
View the documentAlopecia areata
View the documentUrticaria
Open this folder and view contentsConditions common in children
View the documentAcne vulgaris
View the documentPruritus
View the documentTropical ulcers
Open this folder and view contentsAntimicrobial drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntifugal drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAntiseptic agents
Open this folder and view contentsKeratoplastic and keratolytic agents
Open this folder and view contentsScabicides and pediculicides
Open this folder and view contentsAnti-inflammatory and antipruritic drugs1
Open this folder and view contentsAntiallergics and drugs used in anaphylaxis
Open this folder and view contentsUltraviolet radiation-blocking agents (sunscreens)
Open this folder and view contentsMiscellaneous drugs
Open this folder and view contentsAnnex
View the documentSelected WHO Publications of Related Interest
View the documentBack cover
 

Ichthyosis

There are many types of ichthyosis which range from mild types of ichthyosis vulgaris to very rare severe forms such as lamellar ichthyosis. The two most important and common forms of ichthyosis are discussed below.

Ichthyosis vulgaris, an autosomal dominant disease, is the most common hereditary form of ichthyosis. It is characterized by the appearance of dry, rough, whitish scales, which are variable in size, on the extensor surfaces of the arms and legs, and to a lesser extent on the back. The disease usually appears in infancy or early childhood and tends to regress with age. About half the patients also have atopic dermatitis and other signs of atopy. The course of the disease is largely unpredictable, but it is often exacerbated by environmental factors, and particularly by cold.

Acquired ichthyosis is most prevalent in tropical climates, where it is associated with nutritional deficiency disorders, chronic lepromatous leprosy and other debilitating infectious diseases. Clinically, it resembles ichthyosis vulgaris, but it develops later in life as a secondary manifestation of other diseases, including malignant diseases such as lymphoma.

Treatment

Treatment is similar to that of xerosis (see below).

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