Quality Assurance of Pharmaceuticals - A Compendium of Guidelines and Related Materials - Volume 1
(1997; 248 pages) [French] View the PDF document
Table of Contents
Open this folder and view contentsIntroduction
Close this folder1. National drug regulation
Close this folderGuiding principles for small national drug regulatory authorities1,2
Close this folder1. General considerations
View the document1.1 The scope of drug control
View the document1.2 Basic responsibilities
View the document1.3 Licensing functions
View the document1.4 Product licences
View the document1.5 Manufacturers’ and distributors’ licences
View the document1.6 New drug assessments
View the document1.7 Authorization of clinical trials
View the document1.8 Terms of reference of the regulatory authority
View the document1.9 Powers of enforcement
View the document1.10 Technical competence
View the document1.11 Advisory bodies
View the document1.12 Independence of operation
Open this folder and view contents2. Administrative aspects of the licensing process
Open this folder and view contents3. Technical aspects of the licensing process
Open this folder and view contents2. Product assessment and registration
Open this folder and view contents3. Distribution
Open this folder and view contents4. The international pharmacopoeia and related activities
Open this folder and view contents5. Basic tests
Open this folder and view contents6. Laboratory services
Open this folder and view contents7. International trade in pharmaceuticals
Open this folder and view contents8. Counterfeit products
Open this folder and view contents9. Training
View the documentSelected WHO publications of related interest
View the documentBack cover
 
1.4 Product licences

The issuance of product licences is pivotal to any system of drug control. The licence is a legal document that establishes the detailed composition and formulation of the product, the pharmacopoeial or other officially recognized specifications of its ingredients, its clinical interchangeability (in the case of multisource products), and its packaging, shelf-life and labelling. Of itself, this goes a long way towards establishing the assurances of quality, efficacy, and safety to which the system is directed. However, without a viable pharmaceutical inspectorate or access to an independent quality-control laboratory operating to standards that will ensure its credibility in the event of dispute, licensing provisions cannot be effectively enforced.

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